Publication Laka-library:
Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging

AuthorNational Academies of Sciences
-
DateSeptember 2016
Classification 6.07.4.60/27 (MISCELLANEOUS - NUCLEAR MEDICINE / MEDICAL APPLICATIONS - RADIO-ISOTOPES)
Front

From the publication:

Molybdenum-99 for Medical Imaging
Committee on State of Molybdenum-99 Production and Utilization and
Progress Toward Eliminating Use of Highly Enriched Uranium
Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board
Division on Earth and Life Studies
A Report of
The National Academies of
Scienes - Engineering - Medicine

Executive Summary
This Academies study was mandated by the American Medical Isotopes
Production Act of 2012. Key results1 for each of the five study charges
are summarized below; additional details are provided in the report summary
and individual chapters.
Study charge 1: Provide a list of facilities that produce molybdenum-99
(Mo-99) for medical use including an indication of whether these facilities
utilize highly enriched uranium (HEU). (Chapter 3) About 95 percent of the
global supply of Mo-99 for medical use is produced in seven research reactors
and supplied from five target processing facilities located in Australia,
Canada, Europe, and South Africa. About 5 percent of the global supply
is produced in other locations for regional use. About 75 percent of the
global supply of Mo-99 for medical use is produced using HEU targets; the
remaining 25 percent is produced with low enriched uranium (LEU) targets.
One of the reactors used to produce Mo-99 is fueled with HEU.
Study charge 2: Review international production of Mo-99 over the
previous 5 years.2 (Chapter 3) New Mo-99 suppliers have entered the global
supply market since 2009 and further expansions are planned. An organization
in Australia (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation)
has become a global supplier and is currently expanding its available supply
capacity; existing global suppliers in Europe (Mallinckrodt) and South
Africa (NTP Radioisotopes) are also expanding their supply capacities;

This publication is digitally available in the Laka library, but it's not on-line.
E-mail us (info@laka.org) if you would like the pdf sent to you (with the subject, number and title). Of course you can also come by.