Publicatie Laka-bibliotheek:
Technology Risk and Democracy. The Dutch nuclear energy debate (1981-84)

AuteurRob Hagendijk, Arjan Terpstra
1-01-1-10-48.pdf
Datumjuni 2004
Classificatie 1.01.1.10/48 (OPINIE - BREDE MAATSCHAPPELIJKE DISCUSSIE)
Voorkant

Uit de publicatie:

STAGE (Science, Technology and Governance in Europe)
Discussion Paper 12
June 2004




Technology, risk and democracy: The Dutch nuclear energy
                   debate (1981-1984).


                             Rob Hagendijk & Arjan Terpstra1

                                   University of Amsterdam




STAGE is a thematic network under the Fifth Framework Programme (HPSE-CT2001-
50003). STAGE gratefully acknowledges the support of the European Commission.


1
  Names appear in alphabetical order. The research done for this paper was for practical reasons limited
to a study of part of the main primary sources, secondary literature and newspaper sources. Since this
paper is the first of its kind on the subject, no comprehensive research of other authors on the debate is
available. A better understanding of some of the issues, such as the internal procedures of the Steering
Committee, its reliance on scenario's et cetera, will have to wait for in-depth research at the archives of
the Ministry of Economic Affairs, comprehensive media research and interviews with members of the
Committee and other participants.
Contents


1. Introduction                                                          3


2. Optimists and pessimists.                                             5
    Nuclear optimism in post-war Holland and the rise of its nemesis.


3. The 'information phase' of the BMD (September 1981 - October 1982).   16


4. The 'discussion phase' of the BMD and its results.                    29


5. Conclusion: Nuclear energy and democracy on stage.                    39


Literature                                                               43




                                         2
1. Introduction


Current debates about public participation in scientific and technological innovation
may profit from a closer analysis of earlier attempts to involve the public in such
matters. The Dutch public debate about nuclear energy in the early 1980s pro