Publicatie Laka-bibliotheek:
Maximum reasonable radioxenon releases from medical isotope production facilities and their effect on monitoring nuclear explosions

AuteurTh.W.Bowyer, R.kephart, P.W.Eslinger, J.Friese
6-07-4-60-44.pdf
Datumseptember 2012
Classificatie 6.07.4.60/44 (ALLERLEI - MEDISCHE ISOTOPEN - NUCLEAIRE GENEESKUNDE )
Voorkant

Uit de publicatie:

Maximum reasonable radioxenon releases from medical isotope production 
facilities and their effect on monitoring nuclear explosions
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 115C:192-200 · September 2012

Ted W Bowyer, Rosara Kephart, Paul W Eslinger, Judah I Friese

a b s t r a c t
Fission gases such as 133Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world 
for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring 
System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by 
fission production of 99Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope 
production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the 
background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere 
(Stocki et al., 2005; Saey, 2009). These releases pose a potential future 
problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting 
point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is 
both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also 
consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. 
This study concludes that an emission of 5  109 Bq/day from a medical isotope
production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the 
perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be 
an achievable limit for large isotope producers.